My blog has reached over 5000 hits as of today.  For an anime blog that’s only been around for about three months, it feels like an achievement.  Of course, it’s a drop in the ocean compared to beasts like Anime Diet or Sankaku Complex.  But I’m quite happy with the attention I have so far:  I’m in blogrolls, I get written about on Ani-Nouto, and I get high praise from established bloggers.

Other people might write for themselves, but I’ll admit it.  I’m so vain.

Image by Rozen Weapon (http://www.geocities.jp/rozenweapon)

Image by Rozen Weapon (http://www.geocities.jp/rozenweapon)

So on one hand: Hooray, people LIKE me!  But on the other hand, I almost feel an enhanced sense of responsibility, now that I know I’m not just screaming at the walls.

My philosophy from the start has been to write about anime in a thoughtful and intellectually grounded way, but also to be accessible to everyone.  I see the anime fan world as a spectrum:  Anime-related academia is fascinating, and ultimately it’s more permanent, but it’s also tough to decipher and slow by nature.  On the flip side, there are lightning-fast news, reviews and editorials aplenty on the Internet, but critical observation is rare.

There are a few sites that I feel bridge this gap.  Most of them are on my blogroll.  But there isn’t nearly enough, so here I am trying to bring in my own little piece of change by writing micro-essays about the contemporary anime scene.  Maybe this will catch on, and then things will get a bit bigger than my little po-dunk WordPress page.  Or maybe I’ll run out of steam.

Right now, I just hope I’m doing a decent job of it.

Mio 01

In other news, I met a female bassist on the train today who bore a remarkable resemblance to Mio.  Even down to the classy hime cut, which was refreshing compared to all the feathered orange hair I see usually.  I would have loved to ask for her number, but here’s the sad part: We weren’t able to communicate much beyond “bass, kakkoii, daigaku no keion-bu, ganbatte.”  That and a lot of fruitless gesturing.

To be fair, her English was also abysmal (which, incidentally, really makes me wonder about my job).  But that’s the answer, plain and true:  Even if Mio was real and you met her, chances are she literally wouldn’t be able to talk to you. Better start cracking those books for your waifus, boys.

There ought to be an anime about young adults and their English classes, like a Japanese take on Please Teach Me English.  I guarantee it would be comedy gold.